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This is a guest post from Andreea Ayers of Launch Grow Joy.

Fashion/Style is the third most popular category on Pinterest and the second most repinned category on the social sharing site. If that isn’t enough convince you that you need to get a Pinterest account today, then how about this:

Pinterest referrals spend 70% more money than visitors referred from non-social channels and are 10% more likely to make a purchase than those referred by Twitter and Facebook.

Pinterest users want to find your fashion website, but they need your help. The first step to using Pinterest to drive traffic to your fashion site is becoming a part of the community. It will take a little legwork on your end, but the results will pay dividends.

Start by building up your following. Share your Pinterest profile with those who already celebrate your brand on Facebook and Twitter, and add a follow me button (available from Pinterest’s website at https://pinterest.com/about/goodies/) to your newsletter, email signature and website.

Once you’ve encouraged your existing fans to visit you on Pinterest, it’s time to win new fans to your boards. Follow high profile Pinterest users in your niche, comment, repin and get involved in the conversation to get your name out there.

Become a problem solver and look for ways you can help Pinterest users. For example, look for pins asking for style advice or on how to wear a particular piece. Your goal is to make yourself a resource to the community.

Adding links to your pins is crucial to driving traffic to your fashion website from Pinterest

Include a link to your website and a quick description of what you do in your Pinterest profile to tell users who you are.

Choose pin-worthy images for your blog posts and share them on Pinterest. Images with text make great Pinterest posts, so take the golden nugget of information from your blog post and use one of the many free online design programs to build a graphic. Use it in your blog post and share it on Pinterest, linking it back to your site.

Build boards that share knowledge, rather than just images by creating photo tutorials, style guides, and collections of images and designers you love.

For fashion designers, Pinterest offers a unique opportunity to give followers a look behind the curtain and see how you work. Pin sketches, new work and work-in-progress boards to let your fans follow your progress. Link these back to the finished items on your site.

Remember, social media differs from traditional advertising in that users are expecting an interaction, not an ad. Think of it like going to a networking event; If you only talk about your business and don’t converse, ask questions or get to know people, it’s unlike you’ll create any lasting connections. Strive to share your knowledge and your followers won’t be able to resist visiting your fashion site to see what else you have to offer.

Andreea Ayers is a Pinterest expert and creator of Pinterest Advantage, an online training program for entrepreneurs who want to grow their business through Pinterest. She currently blogs at www.launchgrowjoy.com about social media, publicity, retail sales and, of course, Pinterest.

 

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4 Responses

  1. You actually make it seem so easy with your presentation but I find this
    matter to be really something that I think I would never understand.
    It seems too complex and extremely broad for me. I’m looking forward for your next post, I’ll try to get the
    hang of it!

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